cmbutzer:

Octopus! another silkscreen print that I sold out of at MoCCA Fest 2014

cmbutzer:

Octopus! another silkscreen print that I sold out of at MoCCA Fest 2014

(via smilefortyeight)

mayahan:

© Hine Mizushima

(Source: behance.net, via smilefortyeight)

siryl:

As children, I think we all looked up at the sky and imagined animals in the clouds.  Artyom Chebokha has translated that concept into a gorgeously ominous painting entitled "Tenkhariis."

siryl:

As children, I think we all looked up at the sky and imagined animals in the clouds.  Artyom Chebokha has translated that concept into a gorgeously ominous painting entitled "Tenkhariis."

(via ghostfiish)

juneluxray:

usbdongle:

malformalady:

Close-up of a starfish mouth
Photo credit: Mike Dunn

i’m going to put my dick in it

I wouldn’t advise that. Many starfish can push out their cardiac stomach and digest food (perhaps your dick) outside of the body. When preying upon bivalves, they can pry the prey open and secret digestive enzymes and start digesting the bivalve inside of its own shells.
but let’s go with “THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR.”

juneluxray:

usbdongle:

malformalady:

Close-up of a starfish mouth

Photo credit: Mike Dunn

i’m going to put my dick in it

I wouldn’t advise that. Many starfish can push out their cardiac stomach and digest food (perhaps your dick) outside of the body. When preying upon bivalves, they can pry the prey open and secret digestive enzymes and start digesting the bivalve inside of its own shells.

but let’s go with “THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR.”

(via lucifer-is-a-bag-of-dicks)

montereybayaquarium:

An Ancient Fascination

Octopuses and their kin, sea creatures known collectively as cephalopods, have grabbed hold of our collective imagination for thousands of years.

We share this fascination as manifested in art, literature and contemporary culture in “Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes.” Highlights include:

  • A steampunk-style sculpture made from raised copper and brass with glass in the Japanese technique called “Tankin.”
  • Ancient Minoan pottery replicas painted with cephalopod designs.
  • An illustration from Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.
  • A drawing of octopuses attacking a fleet of ships, depicted as fact by a French naturalist in 1803.
  • A highly detailed drawing of cephalopods by famed naturalist Ernst Haeckel.
  • Glass models of squid and octopuses by father-son team of Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka.
  • A replica of the famous abstract work, The Birth of the Cephalopods, by Mark Rothko.
  • A dramatic depiction of a sea of ammonites 73 million years ago.
  • A replica of the intriguing yet slightly disturbing image of Contessa with Squid by Omar Rayyan.
  • Cephalopod tattoo art.

We also commissioned San Francisco Bay Area artist Nemo Gould to create three kinetic sculptures for “Tentacles” using found objects. Gould has transformed a jumble of junk into delightful dioramas that carry conservation messages delivered through a sense of wonderment.

Tentacles" opens April 12.

(via smilefortyeight)

mmvk:

Octopus curl.

mmvk:

Octopus curl.

(via smilefortyeight)

tsiyete:

sarcoptid:

i’d just like to take a moment to appreciate one of my new favorite fishes, the longnosed lancetfish

(via ghostfiish)

archiemcphee:

Nothing says “Our love will last forever.” like a tiny gold squid encircling your ring finger. This tentacular little beauty was handmade by Portland, OR-based jeweler Cheyenne Weil of gin & butterflies. She custom-makes each Squid Wedding Band by hand-carving the ring in wax and then casting it using the lost-wax method.

"This ring is a highly detailed piece with the squid and water/wave design flowing all the way around the ring, leaving no particular part "up." It is a nice 8mm in width, over 2mm thick, and has a delicious weighty feel."

Click here for more information and then check out the rest of Cheyenne’s gin & butterflies shop.

[via Fashionably Geek]

(via jumpingjacktrash)

roachpatrol:

odditiesoflife:

Newly Discovered Deep Sea Worms Unknown to Science

Scientist and marine researcher Alexander Semenov, recently released a number of incredible new photographs of worms, several of which may be completely unknown to science.

Half of the photos were taken near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia during a 2-week conference on marine worms called polychaetes. Semenov photographed 222 different worm species which are now in the process of being studied and documented by scientists.

The other half of the photos were taken during Semenov’s normal course of work at the White Sea Biological Station in northern Russia where he’s head of the scientific divers team. 

give me all of these

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

suicideblonde:

Entangled by Kate McDowell

suicideblonde:

Entangled by Kate McDowell

(via jumpingjacktrash)